Health officials reporting coronavirus cases, deaths again after winter storm delays

Editor’s note: Reporting of coronavirus cases and deaths was delayed because of the winter storm earlier this month. As a result, we are not noting weekly changes in cases and deaths. Vaccine distribution was also affected.

Vaccine doses administered

increased
An average of 92,835 vaccine doses have been administered each day in the last week. As of Feb. 27, 6.2% of Texans have been fully vaccinated.

Hospitalizations

decreased
by 1,450 patients compared with a week ago. As of Feb. 28, 5,696 Texans are hospitalized for the coronavirus.

New cases

On Feb. 28, 2,921 new confirmed cases and 715 new probable cases were reported.

New deaths

On Feb. 28, 197 new deaths were reported.

The Texas Tribune is using data from the Texas Department of State Health Services to track how many people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus in Texas each day. The state data comes from 57 city and county health departments, about 600 hospitals and 340 laboratories and the state vital records registration. It may not represent all cases of the disease given limited testing.

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What you should know:

  • On Feb. 28: Many counties have begun reporting coronavirus numbers again after the winter storm disrupted data reporting earlier this month and fewer Texans were tested. Gov. Greg Abbott also deployed the Texas National Guard to get the COVID-19 vaccines to homebound Texans who are 65 and older.
  • The number of hospitalizations continue to decrease after mid-January record highs, but experts say the pandemic is far from over, especially as new variants of the virus emerge. The governor also said that he is weighing an end to all statewide orders related to the pandemic and that an announcement would come “pretty soon.”
  • How we got here: After businesses started reopening in May, hospitalizations increased dramatically in June and July. In response, Abbott issued a statewide mandate requiring most Texans to wear masks in public spaces. In September, the numbers dropped to levels not seen since June, leading Abbott to loosen restrictions on restaurants, bars and other businesses in regions of the state with steady hospitalization levels.
  • Hospitalizations jumped again before and after the holiday season, leading Texas to its worst outbreak thus far in January. Besides holiday travel, health experts worry loopholes allowing bars to reopen as restaurants and widespread fatigue have also been contributing factors.

Where are most of the cases in Texas?

As of Feb. 28, the state has reported 2.3 million confirmed cases in 254 counties and 356,889 probable cases in 223 counties since the pandemic began. Confirmed cases are detected through more accurate molecular tests, while probable cases are detected through rapid-result antigen tests.

These totals may differ from what county and city health departments report. The Tribune is measuring both the number of cases in each county and the rate of cases per 1,000 residents in the last two weeks.

New confirmed and probable cases reported in the last two weeks
The number of cases reported in the last two weeks shows where outbreaks are occurring. Because some counties aren’t reporting probable cases, not all counties are comparable to one another.
Editor’s note: The number of confirmed cases being reported by the state for Scurry County is inaccurate. Currently, the state is over-counting cases reported by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. We are removing the number confirmed cases for the county until DSHS and the county resolve the issue.
CountyNew cases last 14 daysPer 1,000 PeopleTotal confirmed casesTotal probable casesDeaths
Harris8,4911.84348,8480*5,075
Dallas6,8642.65245,27835,1263,406
Tarrant6,4833.21205,67635,9742,593
Bexar4,5522.36165,40530,3142,894
El Paso3,6924.41123,6900*2,351
Travis2,0791.7375,6170*852
Collin3,6053.8270,04713,242721
Hidalgo5,6126.6150,79124,8082,302
Fort Bend2,3003.1150,2767,296557
Denton3,8274.7448,80615,188648
Statewide72,4622.502,287,135356,88942,936

How many Texans have been vaccinated?

As of Feb. 27, 5.3 million doses have been administered, with 3.5 million people receiving one dose and 1.8 million people, or 6.2% of Texas’ population, fully vaccinated. Both vaccines currently available — Pfizer and Moderna — require two doses, and neither vaccine is approved for children under age 16, who make up about 23% of the population.

Texas received its first shipments of the COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 14. Those currently eligible for vaccination include:

However, because vaccine doses are in short supply, providers are now facing tough decisions about who will get shots.

COVID-19 vaccine doses administered each day

The state has administered 5.3 million doses as of Feb. 27. The number of doses administered on previous days will change as providers report more data for those dates. Vaccines doses remain in short supply.
Vaccine distribution was affected by winter weather earlier this month.

Health experts estimate 75% to 90% of Texans would need to achieve immunity to COVID-19 to reach herd immunity, which would mean vaccinating at least 22 million people, or nearly 100% of adults in the state. Scientists aren’t sure how long immunity lasts for people who were previously infected, making it unclear how much they contribute to herd immunity.

“Whether it achieves herd immunity or not, we've got to vaccinate as many people as possible in a critical period of time to save lives,” said Dr. Peter Hotez, a virologist at Baylor College of Medicine.

Percent of Texans fully vaccinated

Health experts estimate 75% to 90% of Texans need to achieve immunity to COVID-19 to reach herd immunity. As of Feb. 27, about 6.2% of Texas’ 29 million people have been fully vaccinated. One obstacle is vaccines are not approved for children under 16, who make up about 23% of the population.
Vaccine distribution was affected by winter weather earlier this month.
Editor’s note: We removed a projection showing the future pace of vaccinations from this chart on Feb. 11. We are exploring other ways to communicate this information.

State health officials have rolled out vaccine hubs to help administer shots, although many areas don’t have one. Some Texans, particularly in far-flung parts of the state, have resorted to traveling hundreds of miles away from their homes to get immunized.

Percent fully vaccinated by county
The percentage of residents fully vaccinated by county shows which areas have higher rates of immunization compared to the statewide rate.
Vaccine distribution was affected by winter weather earlier this month.

How many people are in the hospital?

On Feb. 28, there were at least 5,696 hospitalized patients in Texas with confirmed coronavirus infections. This data does not account for people who are hospitalized but have not gotten a positive test, and the Texas Department of State Health Services says some hospitals may be missing from the daily counts.

Total current hospitalizations

The state says roughly 2% to 6% of Texas hospitals do not report hospitalizations data each day. The average number of hospitalizations reported over the past seven days shows how the situation has changed over time by de-emphasizing daily swings.
  • 9% of hospitals or more reported incomplete data, falling outside of the typical range of missing data

On Feb. 28, the state reported 11,259 available staffed hospital beds, including 904 available staffed ICU beds statewide. COVID-19 patients currently occupy 8.4% of total hospital beds.

These numbers do not include beds at psychiatric hospitals or other psychiatric facilities, according to DSHS. They do include psychiatric and pediatric beds at general hospitals, and pediatric beds at children’s hospitals.

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients by region

The percentage of hospital beds being used by COVID-19 patients in each trauma service region shows how the virus is impacting hospitals. Occupancy reductions for businesses and mandated bar closures are triggered when this rate exceeds 15% for seven days.

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How many people have died?

The first death linked to the coronavirus in Texas occurred March 16, 2020 in Matagorda County. As of Feb. 28, 42,936 people who tested positive for the virus have died.

On July 27, DSHS began reporting deaths based on death certificates that state the cause of death as COVID-19 instead of relying on counts released by local and regional health departments. On that date, the state added more than 400 previously unreported deaths to the cumulative total. This does not include the deaths of people with COVID-19 who died of an unrelated cause. Death certificates are required by law to be filed within 10 days.

Because of this change, it’s impossible to compare the rate of deaths before and after July 27.

Experts say the official state death toll is likely an undercount.

New deaths from coronavirus reported each day

The average number of deaths reported over the past seven days shows how the situation has changed over time by de-emphasizing daily swings.
Reporting of coronavirus deaths was delayed due to winter weather earlier this month.

How have the number of cases increased each day?

For most of the pandemic, the state only reported confirmed cases of the coronavirus based on criteria published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Confirmed cases are detected using molecular tests, such as PCR tests, which are taken with a nasal swab and are highly accurate according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

In November, the state started reporting probable cases detected through rapid-result antigen tests, which are taken by nasal or throat swab like other viral tests, but the results are much faster and less accurate. These cases can also be detected through other means. Before the state reported probable cases separately, probable cases that were accidentally included in cumulative case counts were removed.

The number of new cases reported drops on weekends, when labs are less likely to report new data to the state.

New confirmed cases of coronavirus each day

The state has reported roughly 2.3 million confirmed cases in 254 counties. The average number of confirmed cases reported over the past seven days shows how the situation has changed over time by de-emphasizing daily swings. Confirmed cases are detected through molecular tests.
Reporting of coronavirus cases was delayed due to winter weather earlier this month.

New probable cases of coronavirus each day

So far, there are 356,889 known probable cases in 223 counties. The state has reported daily probable cases, which can be detected through antigen tests, dating back to November. A total of 31 counties, including Harris, Travis, and El Paso, are not reporting probable cases.
Reporting of coronavirus cases was delayed due to winter weather earlier this month.

How has the positivity rate changed?

The seven-day average positivity rate is calculated by dividing the average of confirmed cases by the average of molecular tests conducted over the last seven days. This shows how the situation has changed over time by de-emphasizing daily swings.

States where the rates are over 10% are in the “red zone”, according to the The White House Coronavirus Task Force. Texas doubled that mark in July before it dropped in August. The rate started exceeding 10% again in October.

7-day average for the positivity rate

The state calculates the positivity rate by dividing confirmed cases by total molecular tests. Because this formula relies on the date on which the test was administered, the rates for previous days are recalculated as more test results from those dates come in.
The rate is affected by winter weather earlier this month as fewer tests have been reported.
  • State did not release testing data

DSHS released another positivity rate based only on rapid-result antigen tests on Dec. 11. As of Feb. 27, the rate was 3.36% out of 2.5 million tests.

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How many people have been tested?

As of Feb. 27, Texas has administered 23.1 million tests for the coronavirus since March 2020. We do not know the number of Texans who have gotten a test because some people are tested more than once. The state’s tally also does not include pending tests.

Coronavirus test results reported to the state each day

The average number of tests reported over the past seven days shows how the situation has changed over time by de-emphasizing daily swings.
  • Molecular tests
  • Antigen tests
  • Antibody tests
  • State did not classify the type of test
  • Viral tests were not broken down by molecular or antigen
Tests reported are lower due to winter weather earlier this month.

State officials are separately reporting the number of antibody tests, which detect whether someone was previously infected. Standard viral tests like molecular and antigen tests determine whether someone currently has the virus.

Testing data is typically reported a day late.

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How is this impacting Texans of color?

Some regions of the state with the highest mortality rates are predominantly Hispanic. Hidalgo and Cameron counties, both along the state’s southern border, have seen death tolls that rival larger and more urban parts of the state like Dallas and San Antonio. In El Paso County, thousands of residents have now died of COVID since the pandemic began, placing El Paso far ahead of other major urban counties in deaths per 1,000 residents.

Similarly, case data gathered earlier in the pandemic in various parts of the state shows the disproportionate impact of the virus on Black and Hispanic neighborhoods. Over the summer, the areas with the highest positivity rates in Harris County were predominantly Hispanic, according to a UTHealth School of Public Health analysis. In Dallas County, lower-income Black communities have also reported some of the highest positivity rates.

A Texas Tribune analysis showed the distribution of the vaccine is also unequal. In Texas’ larger counties, distribution sites receiving the first batches of the vaccine are mostly in whiter, more affluent areas, worrying advocates that vaccines will be out of reach for Black and Hispanic neighborhoods devastated by COVID-19. The state has since announced the launch of dozens of vaccination hubs, including some located in the Rio Grande Valley and more rural areas, that will focus on the most vulnerable communities in those regions.

What else should I know about this data?

These numbers come from the Texas Department of State Health Services, which typically updates statewide case counts by 4 p.m. each day. The data is from the same morning, and it may lag behind other local news reports.

In order to publish data quickly, the state has to bypass what is normally a monthslong process of reviewing the COVID-19 data and performing quality checks before publishing. That’s why all of these numbers and information are provisional and subject to change.

The state’s data includes cases from federal immigration detention centers, federal prisons and starting in mid-May, some state prisons. It does not include cases reported at military bases. From March 13 through March 24, 2020, the Tribune added cases from Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, where hundreds of American evacuees from China and cruise ships were quarantined. Those case counts came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Texas' population estimate is from the Census Bureau's 2019 one-year American Community Survey.

Notes about the data:

On March 24, 2020, the state changed how it reported numbers resulting in a sharp increase in cases.

Antibody tests were included in the new total tests counts for each day before May 14. Previously, the state had counted about 50,000 total antibody tests as virus tests, artificially deflating the positivity rate.

After a system upgrade on June 7 resulting in incomplete test data, the state revised the test numbers for June 6 to show a decrease in total viral tests. The testing numbers for June 6 are not shown in the test results by day chart.

On June 16, the state included 1,476 cases previously reported by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice from Anderson and Brazoria counties in its cumulative case count. The new cases for June 16 do not include those cases.

On July 17, the state received about 5,268 additional cases from Bexar County. The state only included 608 of those cases as new confirmed cases for that day and added the rest to the cumulative count.

On July 19, the state removed 3,676 duplicate antibody tests from the previous day’s total.

From July 23 to July 28, between 9% and 18% of hospitals reported incomplete hospitalization numbers due to changes in reporting to meet federal requirements.

On July 25, the state removed 2,092 probable cases from the Corpus Christi-Nueces County Public Health District that had been previously included in the cumulative case count.

On July 27, the state began reporting deaths based on death certificates that state COVID-19 as the cause of death. On that day, more than 400 previously unreported deaths were added to the total death toll due to the reporting change.

On July 30, the state said an “automation error” caused approximately 225 deaths to be incorrectly added to the overall death count; a subsequent quality check revealed COVID-19 was not the direct cause of death in these cases. We updated the cumulative numbers for July 27-29 to account for this error. The automation error also caused us to incorrectly state the percentage of Hispanics who have died of COVID-19 and the number of previously unreported deaths on July 27. These have been corrected.

On Aug. 3, the state removed 536 duplicate confirmed cases from the overall cases count for Bexar County. Bexar County reported 471 new confirmed cases on this date.

On Aug. 7, DSHS started dividing viral tests into molecular and antigen tests on their site. We’ve combined the two to come up with the total number of viral tests.

On Aug. 7, DSHS reported that some molecular tests had been miscoded, inflating the number of antibody tests over the previous couple of days. This was corrected, resulting in the number of antibody tests to decline from the 6th to the 7th. Because a breakdown of these tests is not available, the charts are showing the inflated numbers on those days.

On Aug. 10, the number of new cases reported did not include new cases from Nueces County due to a “large backlog of positive lab reports” that the county was working through.

In mid-August, several labs submitted large backlogs of tests to the state, which could not have been added until coding errors were fixed and a system update was complete. Because of this, the state reported a record number of tests on Aug. 13. Of those 124,000 tests, approximately 95,000 were from one lab serving several hospitals.

At the same time, DSHS started reporting backlogged cases during their daily updates. They are listed, by month, on the DSHS site. In all instances, these cases were added to the cumulative statewide total, as well as the cumulative count for the county listed on their site. They were not added to the new cases reported for the state that day.

In December, DSHS also began reporting the number of backlogged probable cases. Here’s the total number of backlogged cases reported each day, broken down by case type.

DateTotal backlogged cases
Feb. 28Confirmed: 155; Probable: 24
Feb. 27Confirmed: 2,886; Probable: 104
Feb. 26Confirmed: 443; Probable: 180
Feb. 25Confirmed: 304; Probable: 182
Feb. 24Confirmed: 365; Probable: 152
Feb. 23Confirmed: 463; Probable: 1,642
Feb. 22Confirmed: 3,399; Probable: 334
Feb. 21Confirmed: 209; Probable: 16
Feb. 20Confirmed: 230; Probable: 24
Feb. 19Confirmed: 120; Probable: 26

On Aug. 24, the state was unable to update its testing numbers because of a power outage affecting multiple state agencies. The numbers, however, were added retroactively.

On Sept. 9, TDCJ reported 453 fewer cases among inmates in a state prison in Walker County. These were removed from the county’s total case count, as well as the statewide total.

On Sept. 12, the state said a data entry error caused 91 cases to be incorrectly added to the Sept. 11 statewide and Colorado County total case counts. We updated the cumulative numbers for Sept. 11 to account for this error.

On Sept. 14, DSHS began publishing a new version of the state’s positivity rate, which takes into account the date atest was administered. Previously, the state’s rate relied on the date a test was reported to health officials and verified as a case, which sometimes caused the rate to swing wildly after officials input large numbers of older, backlogged test results. The positivity rate calculation change revealed that the figure was higher in the spring than originally disclosed.

The same day, the state started deduplicating their test results, causing a drop in overall tests. This made the seven-day average of tests incalculable for one week.

Also on Sept. 14, Lamar County overstated their case count by 41 cases. These were removed on Sept. 15. The statewide cumulative case count was also adjusted to reflect this change.

On Sept. 16, case counts decreased in 12 counties. TDCJ reported reduced case counts in Bee and La Salle counties. Cases were deduplicated in Calhoun, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Kerr, Lavaca, Orange, Roberts and Wharton counties. Shackelford and Swisher counties saw decreases after updating case information.

On Sept. 17, case counts decreased in 13 counties. TDCJ reported reduced case counts in Bee, Childress, Houston, Karnes, Madison and Walker counties. Cases were deduplicated in Bandera, Kendall, Titus and Zavala counties. Archer, Swisher and Yoakum counties saw decreases after updating case information.

On Sept. 18, case counts from TDCJ decreased in Anderson County by 1,070, which decreased the total number of cases for that county. Most of these cases were added back on Sept. 21. Also, TDCJ reported reduced case counts in Duval, Fannin, Grimes and Liberty counties. Bailey County saw a decrease after updating case information.

On Oct. 16, El Paso reported 1,555 new cases, which included cases from Oct. 15 and Oct. 16. The county previously did not report any new cases on Oct. 15.

On Oct. 20, some counties could not update their case counts because of an issue assigning cases to the correct jurisdiction in Texas Health Trace, an online system for contact tracing. These were added on Oct. 21.

On Oct. 29, the state removed 273 probable cases from Hays County that had been previously included in the cumulative case count.

On Oct. 30, the state removed 120 positive antigen cases from several counties that had been previously included in the cumulative case count.

On Oct. 31, the state removed 25 duplicate cases from several counties that had been previously included in the cumulative case count.

On Nov. 6, the state adjusted statewide and El Paso County cases after 1,563 cases that should have been reported Nov. 2 and 3 were instead reported Nov. 4.

On Nov. 9, the state removed 2,363 probable cases from Bexar County that had been previously included in the cumulative case count.

On Nov. 11, the state removed 260 overreported cases from Brazoria County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative case count.

On Nov. 14, the state removed 108 overreported cases from McCulloch County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative case count.

On Nov. 14, older cases were incorrectly added to the daily case counts in the following counties: Atascosa, Bandera, Calhoun, Dimmit, Frio, Gillespie, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Jackson, Kendall, Kerr, Lavaca, Medina, Wilson and Zavala. The statewide new case count for that day was adjusted on Nov. 16.

On Nov. 16, the state was unable to update its testing data because of technical difficulties. The issue was resolved, and testing data reported for that date includes laboratory tests from both Nov. 15 and 16.

On Nov. 18, the state removed 2 overreported cases from Loving County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative case count for Nov. 17.

On Nov. 27, the state removed 87 duplicate cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count in the following counties: Concho, Mason, McCulloch and Winkler.

On Dec. 1, the state removed 270 overreported cases from Galveston County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative case count for Nov. 30.

On Dec. 4, the state removed 112 cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 2/3 due to incorrect addresses. The state also removed 33 cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 9/10 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Dec. 5, the state removed 30 cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 9/10 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Dec. 8, the state removed 1,228 probable cases from Lamar County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative case count. Those counts only include confirmed cases.

On Dec. 9, the state removed 8 overreported cases from Pecos County’s cumulative case count and the statewide cumulative count for Dec. 8.

On Dec. 10, the state removed 88 cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 9/10 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Dec. 11, the state removed 96 cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 9/10 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Dec. 14, the state removed 14 confirmed cases and 258 probable cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 9/10 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Dec. 17, the state removed 14,220 probable and suspected cases that were previously included in the confirmed cases total.

On Dec. 30, the state added roughly 80,000 backlogged antibody tests from Carter BloodCare.

On Jan. 14, the state removed 1,403 overreported cases from Henderson County’s total case count for Jan. 13. The state also added 142 cases back to Fannin County’s total case count for Jan. 13 that were accidentally not included. This led to an adjustment of the total statewide count.

On Jan. 17, the state removed 1,632 probable cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 4/5 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Jan. 20, the state removed 82 confirmed cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for Pecos County due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Jan. 30, the state removed 335 confirmed cases from Hays County that had been previously included in the cumulative case count after a routine data audit.

On Jan. 31, the state removed 120 overreported cases from Cameron County’s case count for Jan. 30. The statewide cumulative case count was adjusted as well.

On Feb. 1, Region 7 reported 12,836 backlogged confirmed cases and 1,244 backlogged probable cases. These are included in the statewide backlog totals.

On Feb. 5, the state removed 63 confirmed cases that were previously included in the cumulative case count for counties in Region 7 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Feb. 8, the state removed 555 overreported probable cases from Brazoria County’s case count for Feb. 7. The statewide cumulative case count was adjusted as well.

On Feb. 9, the state removed 194 confirmed cases that had been previously included in the cumulative case count for Coryell County in Region 7 due to ongoing quality assurance processes. The state also removed 144 confirmed cases from the county on Feb. 10.

On Feb. 15, the counties in Region 8 did not update. Anderson, Angelina, Gregg, Henderson, Jasper, Newton, Polk, Rains, Sabine, San Augustine, Smith, Tyler, Van Zandt, and Wood counties also did not update.

On Feb. 16, the state removed 704 probable cases from several counties in Region 11 due to ongoing quality assurance processes.

On Feb. 20 the state corrected an error in reporting from Gray County, removing 100 cases.

On Feb. 25 the state removed 108 cases erroneously reported by TDCJ from Bee and Duval counties.

On Feb. 25 and Feb. 26 the number of confirmed cases for Medina County was overreported by 26 and 20 cases, respectively. The county and statewide cumulative totals have both been adjusted.

Corrections: Between May 27 and May 30, 2020: The tracker incorrectly stated our formula for calculating the average daily positivity rate. On three of those days, we also had a slightly different positive rate, but have updated our numbers to reflect the state's methodology.

On Sept. 14, 15 and 16: The tracker included incorrect numbers for cumulative statewide tests. On those dates, there had been 5,671,966, 5,729,318 and 5,780,424 tests, not 5,637,040, 5,671,966 and 5,729,318 tests, respectively.

On Sept. 21: The tracker included an incorrect number of total cases because of a DSHS error in reporting Bexar County’s backlogged cases. There were 1,742 cases statewide, not 1,732, and 2,078 backlogged cases in Bexar County, not 2,088.

On Oct. 13: The tracker included the incorrect number of cumulative cases and daily cases statewide because the state overreported the number of cases in Brazoria County by 159. There had been 800,256 cumulative cases, not 800,415, and 5,050 daily cases statewide, not 5,209.

On Nov. 21: The tracker included incorrect death counts for 19 counties due to an editing error: El Paso has 949 deaths, not 106; Ellis has 106 deaths, not 949; Deaf Smith has 36 deaths, not 44; Delta has one death, not 36; Denton has 200 deaths, not one; DeWitt has 44 deaths, not 200; La Salle has 14 deaths, not 10; Lamar has 66 deaths, not 14; Lamb has 35 deaths, not 66; Lampasas has 10 deaths, not 35; Madison has 12 deaths, not two; Marion has 15 deaths, not 59; Martin has 176 deaths, not 169; Mason has two deaths, not six; Matagorda has 59 deaths, not 175; Maverick has 169 deaths, not one; McCullouch has six deaths, not 12; McLennan has 175 deaths, not 15 and McMullen has one death, not 7.

On Dec. 23: The tracker incorrectly said the average number of people who reportedly died from coronavirus within the previous seven days was at its highest since July. It was at its highest since August.

Between Jan. 14 and Feb. 19, 2021: The tracker incorrectly labeled a chart of vaccines administered each day. The chart showed vaccines reported to the state, not vaccines administered.

On Feb. 19: The tracker incorrectly reported Texas has administered 22.5 million tests for the coronavirus since March 2020. The state corrected their number on Feb. 20 to account for a lower number of tests administered in the previous week, and the new total is 22.4 million.

Between Jan. 14 and Feb. 19, 2021: The tracker incorrectly labeled a chart of vaccines administered each day. The chart showed vaccines reported to the state, not vaccines administered.

Between Feb. 10 and Feb. 25, 2021: The map showing cases reported in the last two weeks contained inaccurate numbers for Scurry County. Currently, the state is over-counting cases reported by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. We are removing the number confirmed cases for the county until DSHS and the county resolve the issue.

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